Charles Parish
Geer Services, Inc.
San Marco Properties
Geer Services, Inc.
Claude Nolan
Geer Services, Inc.
Geer Services, Inc.
Underwoods
Jul 272013
 

SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — President Obama Saturday honored the 60th anniversary of the peace armistice that brought an end to the Korean War, which claimed more than 2.5 million lives over three years.

The armistice put an end to fighting in the war, but left a military stalemate that goes on today, with North and South Korea separated by a Demilitarized Zone left in the wake of that conflict.

The president laid a wreath at the Korean War Veterans Memorial, paying tribute to those who served in the war, which the U.S. fought from 1950 to 1953. Before an estimated 5,000 people, Obama spoke about the “forgotten war,” the soldiers who fought in it — many of them now in their 80s — and the nation’s eagerness to forget the war and move on.

“On this 60th anniversary, perhaps the highest tribute we can offer our veterans of Korea is to do what should have been done the day you come home. In our hurried lives, let us pause. Let us listen. Let these veterans carry us back to the days of their youth and let us be awed by their shining deeds,” Obama said. “Listen closely and hear the story of a generation, veterans of World War II recalled to duty, husbands kissing their wives goodbye yet again, young men — some just boys, 18, 19, 20 years old — leaving behind everyone they loved to defend a country they never knew and a people they never met.”

The memorial itself is part of the country’s attempt to right a wrong, Obama said. President George H.W. Bush conducted the memorial’s groundbreaking in 1992, nearly 40 years after the war ended.

The president also noted that thousands of American POWs, and soldiers missing in action in Korea, still have not been found.

“To this day, 7,910 Americans are still missing from the Korean War, and we will not stop working until we give these families a full accounting of their loved ones,” the president said.

Obama called Korea a lesson in military preparedness, pointing out that after a quick draw-down from World War II, U.S. troops were left under-equipped, firing rockets that bounced off North Korean tanks.

As the U.S. begins to draw down in Afghanistan, soon after leaving Iraq, Obama pledged the U.S. will maintain the strongest military in the world. And the president disputed the notion that the war had ended in a tie, with North and South Korea divided by the DMZ along the 38th parallel.

“Here, today, we can say with confidence, that war was no tie. Korea was a victory,” the president said to applause. “When 50 million South Koreans live in freedom, a vibrant democracy, one of the world’s most dynamic economies, in stark contrast to the repression and poverty of the North, that is a victory and that is your legacy.”

The president was joined by Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki, Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, who laid their own wreaths. Also in attendance were Special Envoy from the Republic of Korea Kim Jung Hun.

“The veterans we honor today were the young we sent to the mud of Korea with very little notice. The lessons are many, as are the arguments about how they should have been better prepared and equipped to fight that expeditionary mission,” Shinseki said. “What is unarguable, however, is the heroism with which these veterans performed their missions.”

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Jul 132013
 

Official White House Photo by Pete Souza(WASHINGTON) — Able to play golf with pretty much anyone he wants, President Obama is spending his Saturday on a military course with ESPN’s Michael Wilbon and Tony Kornheiser, co-hosts of Pardon the Interruption.

Saturday is Kornheiser’s 65th birthday, as was mentioned on the ESPN show Friday.

They’re playing at Fort Belvoir, a military base off I-95 about 30 minutes south of the White House. Wilbon and Kornheiser did not ride with the president in his motorcade, which arrived at 10:15 a.m., according to pool reports.

On Friday, Wilbon, Kornheiser, and Tony Reali — host of ESPN’s Around the Horn and PTI’s longtime on-air fact-checker — ate lunch at the White House and visited with Obama in the Oval Office.

Reali described the visit in a YouTube video posted to the Around the Horn channel.

“Coolest experience of my life,” he said.

Two years ago, Obama told Reali and frequent guest Kevin Blackistone that Around the Horn is the only TV show he watches, Reali said.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Jun 072013
 

Win McNamee/Getty Images(SAN JOSE, Calif.) — When President Obama stepped up to the podium Friday morning, the cameras were rolling, the stage was perfectly set and reporters were eagerly awaiting his remarks on health care. But something was missing.

“There’s only one problem, and that is that my remarks are not sitting here,” Obama said, as he looked at the barren podium. “People!

“By Friday afternoon, things can get a little challenged,” he quipped.

White House staffers frantically scanned the room and reporters chuckled as the president waited … and waited.

“People!” Obama shouted again.

A shaken staffer finally emerged with the remarks, tripping as he rushed onto the stage to deliver them to the president.

“Oh, goodness,” Obama said, smiling. “Folks are sweating back there right now.”

 

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Apr 272013
 

Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images(WASHINGTON) — President Obama spent Saturday afternoon at the golf course, just a few hours before he is set to attend the White House Correspondents’ Dinner later in the evening.

The president golfed at Joint Base Andrews with former U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk and White House aides Marvin Nicholson and Michael Brush.

President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama will attend the annual dinner held by the White House Correspondents Association at the Washington Hilton hotel Saturday evening where journalists, politicians and celebrities will have the chance to see the president’s comedic side in action alongside comedian Conan O’Brien, who is the guest entertainer for tonight’s soiree.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Apr 142013
 

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — Days after the Senate cleared a significant hurdle in the debate on new gun measures, Saturday Night Live took aim at the Senate’s work on gun control in its cold open sketch last night, spoofing the Senate’s cloture vote on guns and the Manchin-Toomey background check deal reached this week.

“This week The Senate voted 68 to 31 to begin debating the idea of discussing gun control,” the President Obama character, who is played by Jay Pharaoh, said of the Senate’s cloture vote Thursday. “Let me say that again. They’ve agreed to think about talking about gun control.”

Obama then called on Sens. Joe Manchin, D-W.V., played by Jason Sudeikis, and Pat Toomey, R-Penn., portrayed by Bill Hader, to join him on stage to tout the background check deal they brokered this week.

“These men risked everything for this bill,” he said. “I mean, Senator Manchin represents West Virginia and he’s proposing gun reform? He’s gonna lose his job. And Senator Toomey, this man is a Republican who is willing to make just the slightest compromise on gun control? He’s going to lose his job too.”

“If our bill passes, no individual can purchase a handgun from a private dealer without being asked, ‘Are you a good person?’ as well as the follow-up question, ‘Seriously, are you?’” the Toomey character said.

“Is this bill what we wanted? No,” the Manchin character said. “Is it what the NRA wanted? No.  But does it at least help in some small way? No. Probably not.”

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio