Underwoods
Geer Services, Inc.
Charles Parish
Geer Services, Inc.
Claude Nolan
Geer Services, Inc.
San Marco Properties
Geer Services, Inc.
Nov 142012
 

Brand X Pictures/Thinkstock(BALTIMORE) — A Baltimore bus driver has been suspended following a brawl with a female student who the driver accused of “being disrespectful.” The tussle was caught on tape and posted to YouTube.

When the video begins, the female bus driver is standing over the passenger and struggling with her as the teenager kicks and punches the bus driver. When the passenger stands up, the two wrestle their way to the back of the vehicle with the bus driver holding the girl by her arm and by her hair. The two struggled to the back of the bus with the girl throwing several punches at the driver’s head and shoulder. The driver eventually pushes the girl into a corner seat.

The driver seems to be shouting, “You want to fight somebody?” The passenger answers, “No.”

The passenger can also be heard saying, “Get off of me.” Other passengers were shouting, videotaping and some laughter can be heard.

It is unclear what initiated the fight.

 

When the fighting stopped, the two women had an inaudible tense exchange before the bus driver returned to the front of the bus. “You shouldn’t have jumped in my face,” the passenger said.

Moments later, the driver can be heard saying, “It wasn’t about that. It’s about being disrespectful.”

The incident occurred on Monday at around 2 p.m. and the video was posted to YouTube on Tuesday. It has been viewed over 106,000 times.

“The bus operator reported that an incident had occurred on her bus and then we got calls from media informing us that it has been posted on YouTube,” Maryland Transit Administration spokesman Terry Owens told ABC News. “The report included some details, but I’m not going to discuss the content of that report.”

Neither the bus driver nor the passenger have been identified. Owens said the the driver has been with the agency since 2003 and that the passenger involved was a student and a juvenile. He said no one was seriously injured.

The driver has been suspended without pay, pending the results of an investigation, according to Owens.

“We hold the safety of our passengers and employees as our highest priority at the MTA,” he said. “Our employees are expected to respect this policy and passengers are expected to abide by the rules and policies of the agency when using our systems.”

The incident is being investigated by the Maryland Transit Administration Police.

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Nov 082012
 

Win McNamee/Getty Images(CHICAGO) — The morning after he won re-election, an emotional President Barack Obama credited his youthful staff of several hundred with running a campaign that will “go on in the annals of history.”

“What you guys have accomplished will go on in the annals of history and they will read about it and they’ll marvel about it,” Obama told his team Wednesday morning inside the Chicago campaign headquarters, tears streaming down his face.

“The most important thing you need to know is that your journey’s just beginning. You’re just starting. And whatever good we do over the next four years will pale in comparison to whatever you guys end up accomplishing in the years and years to come,” he said.

The moment, captured by the Obama campaign’s cameras and posted online, offers a rare glimpse at the president unplugged and emotional. During the first four years of his presidency, Obama has never been seen publicly crying.

He first came to Chicago, he told the campaign staff, “knowing that somehow I wanted to make sure that my life attached itself to helping kids get a great education or helping people living in poverty to get decent jobs and be able to work and have dignity. And to make sure that people didn’t have to go to the emergency room to get health care.”

“The work that I did in those communities changed me much more than I changed those communities because it taught me the hopes and aspirations and the grit and resilience of ordinary people,” he said, as senior strategist David Axelrod and campaign manager Jim Messina looked on. “And it taught me the fact that under the surface differences, we all have common hopes and we all have common dreams. And it taught me something about how I handle disappointment and what it meant to work hard on a common endeavor, and I grew up.”

“So when I come here and I look at all of you, what comes to mind is, it’s not that you guys remind me of myself, it’s the fact that you are so much better than I was in so many ways. You’re smarter, you’re so better organized, you’re more effective,” he said.

Obama said he expected many of those who helped to re-elect him will assume new roles in progressive politics, calling that prospect a “source of my strength and inspiration.”

Senior campaign officials said Thursday that the Obama campaign infrastructure — the field offices and network of hundreds of thousands of volunteers — would undergo a period of transition in the coming weeks to determine how to remain sustainable and influential.

“We have remarkable staff, and the campaign that Jim [Messina] put together, you know, is the best in history,” said senior Obama adviser David Plouffe. “But the reason those people got involved was because they believed in Barack Obama. It was the relationship between them and our candidate.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Nov 082012
 

Win McNamee/Getty Images(CHICAGO) — The morning after he won re-election, an emotional President Barack Obama credited his youthful staff of several hundred with running a campaign that will “go on in the annals of history.”

“What you guys have accomplished will go on in the annals of history and they will read about it and they’ll marvel about it,” Obama told his team Wednesday morning inside the Chicago campaign headquarters, tears streaming down his face.

“The most important thing you need to know is that your journey’s just beginning. You’re just starting. And whatever good we do over the next four years will pale in comparison to whatever you guys end up accomplishing in the years and years to come,” he said.

The moment, captured by the Obama campaign’s cameras and posted online, offers a rare glimpse at the president unplugged and emotional. During the first four years of his presidency, Obama has never been seen publicly crying.

He first came to Chicago, he told the campaign staff, “knowing that somehow I wanted to make sure that my life attached itself to helping kids get a great education or helping people living in poverty to get decent jobs and be able to work and have dignity. And to make sure that people didn’t have to go to the emergency room to get health care.”

“The work that I did in those communities changed me much more than I changed those communities because it taught me the hopes and aspirations and the grit and resilience of ordinary people,” he said, as senior strategist David Axelrod and campaign manager Jim Messina looked on. “And it taught me the fact that under the surface differences, we all have common hopes and we all have common dreams. And it taught me something about how I handle disappointment and what it meant to work hard on a common endeavor, and I grew up.”

“So when I come here and I look at all of you, what comes to mind is, it’s not that you guys remind me of myself, it’s the fact that you are so much better than I was in so many ways. You’re smarter, you’re so better organized, you’re more effective,” he said.

Obama said he expected many of those who helped to re-elect him will assume new roles in progressive politics, calling that prospect a “source of my strength and inspiration.”

Senior campaign officials said Thursday that the Obama campaign infrastructure — the field offices and network of hundreds of thousands of volunteers — would undergo a period of transition in the coming weeks to determine how to remain sustainable and influential.

“We have remarkable staff, and the campaign that Jim [Messina] put together, you know, is the best in history,” said senior Obama adviser David Plouffe. “But the reason those people got involved was because they believed in Barack Obama. It was the relationship between them and our candidate.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Nov 032012
 

ABC News(TUCSON, Ariz.) — A horrific home invasion was caught on tape in Arizona and two of the three suspects remain at large.

The video, which was recorded by the homeowner’s surveillance camera, shows two men approaching the Tucson home.

Police said the suspects initially offered to do yard work. Suddenly, one of the men puts the homeowner in a choke hold, while the second man began beating him.

In the midst of the chaos, two people came out of the home but were immediately forced back inside at gunpoint, while the homeowner was dragged into his home with a gun to his head.

A third suspect is then seen entering through the front door.

The Pima County Sheriff’s Office was able to use the video to identify and arrest Dominic Tyrone Dixon, however his two accomplices, who got away with wallets and cell phones, are still at large.

No one was seriously injured in the home invasion, but Tom Peine, deputy with the Pima County Sheriff’s Department, said authorities are working swiftly to identify and apprehend the suspects.

“They could go out, commit additional crimes,” he said. “They have been very violent in their approach.”

 

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio

Oct 082012
 

Peter Kramer/NBC/NBC NewsWire(SAN DIEGO) — Seven months ago, Kony 2012 filmmaker Jason Russell was moving at a frenetic pace, crisscrossing the country doing interviews and making appearances, trying to keep up with the viral success of his campaign.

And then came the naked public meltdown on a San Diego street that was captured on video.

He addressed the bizarre incident in a new video he hopes will bring interest and action back to Kony 2012, a campaign that calls for the arrest of alleged Ugandan warlord Joseph Kony.

“My mind betrayed me and I was hospitalized,” Russell said in the new video. “If you’re put in the position to give answers to every question a dozen times over, your mind starts to lose track of where you are, if you’ve slept, who’s for you, who’s against you.”

Attempts to reach Russell for comment were unsuccessful.

Supporters, many of whom learned about alleged Ugandan war lord Joseph Kony for the first time through the video, which was uploaded to YouTube on March 5, purchased t-shirts and action kits to help fund Invisible Children’s quest to bring Kony to justice.

The film garnered one million views in 36 hours and has been seen over 100 million times, far exceeding the group’s wildest dreams.

However, with the intense interest came scrutiny.

“We didn’t see the tsunami coming. We just turned around and we were all under water,” Russell said in the video.

Ten days after the original video was released, a naked and screaming Russell was held down near a San Diego intersection until police arrived. No charges were filed.

Following the meltdown, Russell told the Los Angeles Times he spent six weeks in care facilities before he returned home and kept a low profile.

Russell, 33, is a filmmaker by trade and works full-time as a creative director at his organization, Invisible Children, which he started with two college friends in 2004. He is a married father of two children and resides in San Diego, Calif.

Now that he’s feeling healthy, Russell said he’s hoping to finish what he started.

Kony 2012 is calling on supporters to march around the White House on Nov. 17 to demand Kony be brought to justice.

“We want to do some epic things because our time on Earth is so short,” Russell told ABC News as his first campaign was taking off. “Why not do this? Start here with Kony. Use him as the example of what injustice looks like in the world and then we’re going to move to the next one and the next one.”

Copyright 2012 ABC News Radio