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Jul 282013
 

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(PRESCOTT, Ariz.) — An Arizona man had to be resuscitated after being struck by lightning during a golf game on Thursday. According to the Prescott Daily Courier, 75-year-old Ray Row was on his 18th hole at the Antelope Hills Golf Course in Prescott, Ariz., when he was hit by lightning.

When Row wasn’t responsive, two nearby golfing partners started CPR and called for help.

“He was not breathing and had no pulse,” Rob Zazueta of the Chino Valley Fire District told the Prescott Daily Courier. “We got a pulse right before he was loaded on the gurney.”

Row is reportedly in stable condition at the Yavapai Regional Medical Center in Prescott, Ariz.

Row was struck by lightning just three days after a married couple were killed by a lighting strike at the LeFevre Scenic Outlook in Fredonia, Arizona. A teenage boy was also injured in that lightning strike.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Jul 202013
 

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(LAS VEGAS) — Severe thunderstorms hit Las Vegas Friday evening causing flash flooding near the Strip.

Nevada Energy tweeted overnight that crews were working to restore power to about 33,000 customers.

Storms hit the northeast side of Las Vegas, pounding the area with rain and strong gusts of wind in the early evening. A 71 mph gust was recorded at Nellis Air Force Base.

Some areas experienced more than 2 feet of water. National Weather Service Meteorologist Todd Lericos, said roads were the worst affected by the storm.

“The widespread nature of the precipitation as the storm came across really caused a lot of inundation of a lot of the drainages around town and that cause a lot of headaches at intersections and road crossings,” Lericos said.

According to Lericos, at least two water rescues took place in the Las Vegas metro area due to rapidly rising water.

Thankfully, the floodwaters are receding.

“We’ll start to see a lot of the waters recede as all of it works its way out of the valley and into Lake Mead but we still may see some ponding of water in areas,” Lericos said.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Jul 072013
 

Burke/Triolo Productions/Comstock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — It’s been a hot weekend in the Northeast as temperatures in New York City Sunday are expected to rise above 90 degrees for the third straight day.

The National Weather Service has issued an excessive heat warning for the city and parts of New Jersey, as high humidity will make temperatures feel well over 100 degrees.

“When the humidity levels are so high, that moisture has no place to go so you sweat and the sweat stays on you,” explained National Weather Service Meteorologist Michael Silva in New York City. “And when the sweat stays on you the heat stays on you.”

Silva said the combination of high temperatures and humidity can be dangerous for children and the elderly.

“Heat is one of the number one killers in terms of weather related fatalities,” he said. “That’s why we suggest people take extra precaution in these events of extreme heat.”

Residents are advised to stay inside and out of the sun when possible, and to drink plenty of fluids.

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

Jun 302013
 

Jupiterimages/Thinkstock(LAS VEGAS) — The West Coast is preparing for what could be another three days of record temperatures, as Saturday’s heat has created dangerous conditions from California to Texas.

According to ABC Meteorologist Ginger Zee, Saturday saw record temperatures across the region. The temperature in Needles, Calif. reached 123 degrees, the highest ever in June. Sacramento, Calif. made it up to 107 degrees, San Antonio, Texas hit 108 and it was 119 in Phoenix. Salt Lake City has already seen four days of temperatures near 105 degrees.

That heat is expected to continue over the next few days. Las Vegas is expecting an all-time high of 117 degrees while Death Valley, Calif. will look to live up to its name with a scorching 129 degree temperature.

This heat is dangerous. One person is dead in Las Vegas, and dozen more have been hospitalized for heat-related illness. A woman in San Diego had to be air rescued after the heat made her sick while on a hike. Volunteers in Houston are bringing the homeless water and ice.

 Residents are advised to stay out of the sun and keep hydrated

 

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio

May 102013
 

iStockphoto/Thinkstock(NORMAN, Okla.) — Just two years after the worst 12 month period for EF1 or stronger tornados in U.S. history, the country got a big break, as new research from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows that last year saw a record low number of severe twisters.

From May 2010 to April 2011, the United States was hit by over 1,000 big tornados, causing more than 535 deaths. The most recent period, from May of last year until this past April, saw only seven tornado fatalities, and less than 200 tornadoes recorded.

According to Harold Brooks, a scientist with the National Severe Storm Lab in Norman, Oklah., it’s “the fewest number of tornado fatalities in a 12 month period since the 19th century.”

Scientists have data about tornados and tornado-related deaths going back to 1954.

Why has the nation been so lucky on this front compared to two years ago? Experts say that a hot summer and a cold winter are factors.

“In the summer-time, when it’s very hot, what we tend to have is the jet-stream is located far north into Canada, and it tends to be very dry at the surface, that’s why we have droughts,” explained Brooks. “When the jet-stream is that far north, the change in the winds with height is weak over the middle part of the country and so none of the ingredients come together to produce the kinds of environments we want to have for tornadoes.”

Copyright 2013 ABC News Radio